safelanechange

A SAFER LANE CHANGE
and BLIND SPOT ELIMINATED

safelanechange
safelanechange
safelanechange
safelanechange
safelanechange
safelanechange

The Blind Spot, created by the flat mirror on the driver's side becomes a serious hazard especially as older drivers find their necks less supple. A full head turn requires a shoulder turn, creating loss of attention to the highway ahead. Both serious lane change situations and rear end collisions are steadily increasing. This problem must be solved!

The wide angle convex mirror on the passenger side allows no Blind Spot, for as the car in the adjacent lane leaves its field of vision, the car itself is seen directly beyond the mirror. But there is still a serious problem. The following car “is closer than it seems” as the wide angle lens makes the image disarmingly small.
This limitation is overcome by a 2" frame or “target” placed in the middle of the mirror and directed down the adjacent lane. To have the safety of a three-car length separation, 50 feet, for a lane change, verified by personal months of road tests, the image must fit within the frame, or be the same size, at times a little off center. To center it requires just a shift of shoulders without a head turn. The frame has a second equally important function. It is a reference point that allows the driver to judge the relative speed of the following car. Thus as the image enlarges through the frame, caution is demanded. It applies to all sizes of vehicles. A motorcyle at 40 feet is 2 1/2 car lengths behind and fits the frame.. The large less maneuverable 18 wheeler or a bus will fit at 65 feet, providing additional safety at lane change.
The flat mirror on the driver's side requires a 2 3/4 “frame” or “target” to assure 50 feet of safety with a lane change. Where youthful head turn is quick and effective to visualize a car in the Blind Spot, the “frame” leaves no doubt as to the safety of the lane change for all ages..

But the elderly driver still remains at risk. Therefore we placed the “framed” wide angle convex mirror on the driver's flat side mirror and a full range of vision results with just a shift of the eyes or slight head turn. Full attention to the road ahead is uninterrupted.To place the image in the “frame” requires just a a shoulder shift, not a head turn, Because of the shorter eye-to- mirror distance, this frame is 1 5/8" square. Full vision is assured. These convex mirrors have been on high performance vehicles in Europe for some years, with driver's willing to sacrifice accuracy for wider vision. As habit gives way and the fear of missing the Blind Spot disappears, this modification should with time materially alter the need for driving schools to require the head turn. Their first mission will be to emphasize continuous attention to the road ahead.